The End of Iraq: How The West Still Pays for 2003

July 20, 2014
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The seemingly unstoppable march of ISIS/ISIL (now the Islamic State) through much of Iraq and some of Syria has quickly rekindled the vociferous debate surrounding the invasion of 2003. While today’s crisis is the product of many factors, the war in Iraq and its subsequent management not only predestined this conflict, but foreclosed any potential […]

Ukraine and the ‘New Cold War’: The Return of Neutralism

June 4, 2014
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Whether the Crimean crisis heralds a new era of international relations (or not), it has clearly been a pivotal moment in Russia’s relationship with the West. The world over balances of power are shifting, and though the United States remains unrivalled in sheer power, close to the borders of rising China and the increasingly-assertive Russia […]

Guest Post: China and the Crimea Conundrum

March 12, 2014
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With the EU-US alliance’s imposition of heavy sanctions on Russia over its de facto annexation of Crimea, the world is now looking to Russia’s perceived long-term strategic ally China to deliver a breakthrough in the diplomatic deadlock that has emerged between Putin and the West. While many analysts were expecting China to side with Russia on account […]

Posted in: Guest Writers

Power vs. Interest: Ukraine’s Dwindling Options

March 2, 2014
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Predictions regarding Ukraine’s future following a Russian invasion (in all but name) abound, and while almost all expect bloodshed, some go as far as to predict the forthcoming apocalypse. Amidst such exclamations there have been few moderate voices, Stephen Walt and Medhi Hassan represent an inconspicuous minority. But, if one is to forgive the generalisation that most […]

Hanging in the Balance: Ukraine’s Russian Republic

March 1, 2014
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Over the past four or so months, Ukraine has witnessed protest and rioting that dwarfs its 2004 Orange Revolution in every respect. Beginning as a protest against what was seen as undue Russian influence in Ukraine’s last-minute withdrawal from an Association Agreement with the European Union, this volte-face in favour of closer Russian association soon came […]

Free Press Under Threat?: The State of UK Journalism

February 25, 2014
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From Edward Snowden’s NSA leaks to the phone hacking scandal, journalists are increasingly making the news. While the UK government’s response to the allegations of phone hacking, a judge-led inquiry, was measured, its reaction to the revelations brought forth by Edward Snowden has been thinly veiled panic. And the result is worrying. Under pressure from […]

Two Very Different Wars on Terrorism: How the Cold War Haunts Collaboration

February 3, 2014
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On the 29th of December, at 12:40 Moscow Time, an explosion gutted the entrance to Volgograd’s central train station leaving eighteen dead and forty-four injured. The explosion was recorded on CCTV, the shockwave rocking the camera while those civilians visible scatter from the blast. The very next morning a trolleybus erupted in the Dzerzhinsky district, killing […]